The Saga of the Sweater

It only took just under 3 years and 9 months.

I first posted about this project on April 30, 2015, with updates on November 6, 2016, September 14, 2017, and April 13, 2018.

This past week, because of being pretty much snowed in for a couple of days, I finally sat down to sew the seams and weave in the ends.

Now, if I were only as thin as the model in the photo.

Ana sweater

One size fits all? Not so much.

Maybe my daughter will like it.

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“Plan B” Crib Quilt

My latest submission to Project Linus:

plan b quilt

This is a crib-size version of “Plan B” from Save the Scraps by Gayle Bong.

In reducing the number of blocks, I had to recalculate the number of 2″ scrappy squares I would need.

I failed. Not sure where my calculations went awry, and sometimes it’s just not worth trying to backtrack to figure it out.

First I thought I had too many, so I used the extras in one of my kitties.

Then, after I’d finished making the gray-star blocks, I didn’t have any for the scrappy-star blocks.

I do know how to do simple addition and multiplication — really! — but just couldn’t do it last month.

 

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Linus Quilt #2: Green Pinwheels

Earlier this week, I finished the second quilt top destined for Project Linus.

green pinwheels

Based on “Summer Breezes” from Scrap-Basket Surprises by Kim Brackett, I made a few changes.

Some of the fabric remnants I wanted to use were narrower than 2-1/2″. So I adjusted the strip width to 2-1/4″. I also added just two borders, rather than the three in the original quilt.

And I also made it smaller — 5 rows instead of 7. I had just enough of the lighter green fabrics to use each one twice in the Rail Fence blocks.

 

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On to the Next

Yesterday, I sewed the border on the Perkiomen Valley quilt.

perkiomen finished

I even used up the last of a small piece of fabric, so my bin of brown, tan, orange, and yellow is every so slightly depleted. (It’s the small piece in the middle of the lower border.)

Tomorrow, I will take it to work and send it on to our Bremerton store for their monthly Project Linus bee.

Before I wrapped things up in my studio, I went through my stack of scrappy quilt books to select my next project.

I’m not sure if I’ll make it the same size, or just 5 rows. I’m leaning toward the smaller size.

As for colors, I think this time I will delve into my green and blue stash.

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Raiding My Fabric Stash

Since I started quilting, some 35 years ago, I’ve preferred to make quilts of my own design.

But recently, I decided to embark on a new course of action.

I have a pretty extensive library of quilt books, collected during the years I was employed by a publisher of such. And I have a pretty respectable fabric stash.

I decided I would try to make one quilt from each of the books on my shelves.

I could have started with the first book on the first shelf. Instead, I selected all the books that feature scrappy quilts.

The first quilt I chose to make is “Perkiomen Valley Nine Patch” from Scrap Frenzy by Sally Schneider.

I cut out the pieces sometime during the summer. Several days ago, I finished sewing the blocks together, but only got around to pressing them and arranging them on my quilt wall today.

perkiomen quilt

They may be there awhile.

 

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Up, Up, and Away

Yesterday, for my birthday, Tim and I went for a ride in a hot air balloon.

Back when I worked in Woodinville, every summer I would see them floating over the valley. Somewhere along the way, I decided it would be a fun thing to experience.

We chose the Sunrise Flight. Both of us tend to wake up quite early, because of work but also we are just naturally inclined that way. So it wasn’t a hardship for us to meet up at 6:00 am.

Before we left the house, we received an email informing us that the ride was a “go.” Sometimes, because of weather, a ride may need to be rescheduled. Lately, smoke from Canadian fires has been a compromising factor.

At the meeting location — the McDonalds in Woodinville — everyone was sorted into three groups and driven out to a field behind the Maltby Cafe where the balloons and gondolas were offloaded and the balloons inflated (not “blown up”).

First, a powerful, gas-operated fan blows air into the balloon. When it is about 80 percent inflated, then two propane burners attached to the gondola were blasted into the balloons to heat the air and cause them to rise.

The gondolas were righted and we all climbed in.

balloon 4

There were three compartments in our gondola — one for the operator with the propane tanks and two for the passengers. Besides us, there were four other adults and one child. More propane was blasted and we took off.

balloon 5balloon 5aballoon 6balloon 7

We were told that you can’t really control what direction the balloon travels in. That is completely subject to the wind. The operator can only make it go up or down, or make it rotate. Sometimes we were above the other balloons, sometimes below.

balloon 8balloon 11

Even though it wasn’t as smoky as it had been earlier in the week, it was still kind of hazy. We did get a glimpse of Mount Rainier, however.

balloon 12a

As we drifted eastward, we ran into some foggy clouds.

balloon 13balloon 14

The clouds got thicker, and we could see the balloon’s shadow.

balloon 15

After about 45 minutes, we were over Cottage Lake, and we headed toward a landing just north of the lake.

balloon 15a

One of the other balloons landed in a different field nearby.

balloon 16

After touchdown, the balloons had to be deflated and everything packed back onto the trailers.

balloon 17

The trip concluded with a champagne toast.

 

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My Kind of Florals

Last weekend, I was in Portland, Oregon, for Spring Quilt Market.

In addition to meeting up with several of my freelance clients, I took the opportunity to peruse the new offerings from the various fabric companies with an eye towards what sorts of floral prints they’re debuting.

Late last year, I started piecing Grandmother’s Flower Garden units. After a month or so, I had completed four full motifs and one half-motif.

Now, I have completed 19 full motifs and eight half-motifs. Can you tell that I’m loving it?

When I embarked on this project, I made a rule for myself that I would not use the same fabric twice. I have what I like to think of as a respectable stash of floral fabrics. I’m still sorting through my bin and coming up with pairings that I like, but I can see that I’m not going to have as many as I need, for the size quilt I envision.

Whenever I’m in a fabric store, I look around to see what sorts of florals they have, but it’s been hard to find ones that I like. I purchased a lot of my floral prints several (or many) years ago, and the ones that are available just aren’t the sort I’m looking for.

But that may be changing.

What I saw at Market was encouraging.

Several companies were displaying collections that included prints featuring aspects that appeal to me — all-over designs that are representational of real flowers, either realistically or impressionistically rendered.

These are just the ones that I took pictures of. I also collected several brochures that showed the following:

From Maywood Studio: Aubergine, Chloe, English Countryside, and Emma’s Garden.

From Elizabeth’s Studio: Roses, Tulips, Pansies, and Zinnias.

From Riley Blake: Fruitful Pleasures and Afternoon Picnic.

From Benartex: Midnight Poppies and Lilacs in Bloom.

Some of these are available; others will ship later this year.

I can’t wait!

 

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